18th Century Advertising, When Brevity Wasn’t Key

Posted by on Feb 4, 2010 in 18th Century, All Posts, Newspaper Ads | 6 Comments

In 18th century media, long before the days of 140-character advertising (i.e., Twitter), copywriting was less of an art and more of a science. Does this advertisement from the May 10, 1764 issue of Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette make you want to pick up some Benjamin Jackson Mustard and Chocolate? Click the image to enlarge.

6 Comments

  1. raglinen (Historic Newspapers)
    February 5, 2010

    18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

  2. tehistory (T/E Historical Soc.)
    February 5, 2010

    RT @raglinen: 18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

  3. jmadelman (Joseph Adelman)
    February 5, 2010

    And this is one of the more readable ads! RT @RagLinen 18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

  4. GoHuman (GoHuman)
    February 5, 2010

    RT @toddand RT @raglinen 18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

  5. BirkbeckEMS (Birkbeck EMS)
    February 5, 2010

    Mmmm…Oat Grots!: RT @RagLinen: 18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

  6. Haukr (Giuseppe F)
    February 5, 2010

    RT @raglinen: 18th century advertising, when brevity wasn’t key — http://tinyurl.com/yj37xkn

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